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1. Donya Bouzarjomehri

 
 

TABOUGIE.” I took a long time to think about what this word meant to me. What each separate word, taboo and bourgeois, defined. How they contrasted one another so dominantly in my mind, but together embodied a tension that has inherently played a significant role in my life.

 
 

TEHRAN, IRAN

 

CARTAGENA, COLOMBIA

 

I am a Persian woman, 1st generation American. There is a lot of weight attached to 1st generation children, one that can only really be understood by other 1st generation-ers.

 
 

We live in the world of a 3rd culture, navigating between the rules and values of our heritage and that of our birthland.

 
 

And one does not necessarily accept the other. Eternal tension.

 

SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE

 

INLE LAKE, MYANMAR

 

Identifying deeply with my Persian culture, growing up I found many things that I had identified as “normal” were not accepted by the bourgeois culture of the country where I was born. Taboo.

 
 

Years later, I see many of those identified “taboos” being appropriated into American culture, now deemed as “interesting,” “avant-garde,” “original.” AKA bourgeois culture approved.

 

FES, MOROCCO

 

BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

 

PARIS, FRANCE

 

TEHRAN, IRAN

 
 

By using color for the "taboo" and black and white for the "bourgeois,” I am pointing to how appropriation has made the image devoid of its true and original meaning.

 

TEHRAN, IRAN

 

PARIS, FRANCE

 

FES, MOROCCO

 

The above compilation of photographs aims to showcase this exact idea of “TABOUGIE” : bourgeois culture appropriating what they previously deemed as taboo, worldwide.

 
 

Donya Bouzarjomehri

gram: @donyabou